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SDG 4: Quality education

Cheryl Tan's picture

ARE YOU AWARE?

Are you aware of underprivileged students who have been left behind during this pandemic and are unable to access the internet for online learning? As part of the growing phase, I realize how important education is and could be a life-changing event for most of us to have a better life for ourselves and our families. I am involved in a volunteering and community-based movement through an inspiring camp in Malaysia to support, empower and inspire underprivileged students. Our hope is to provide a positive impact on the lives of today's youth and to bring out the best of them for the nation.

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Cheryl Tan | 11/19/2020 - 19:26

Coming here to Melbourne really made me realize how privileged most of us are in terms of good education so I have always wanted to give back to the community to empower the youths back home. I feel that a lot needs to be done, but I hope we can raise public awareness and create a change through Green Steps. #togetherwechangelives

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Reshveny Sanmugam's picture

Healthy ageing

With the global pandemic, there was a rise in digital innovation and an increase usage of technology. The one group that are affected by this would be the elderly due to the lack of understanding of technology. Learning should not be restricted to a certain age group. I pledge to include elderly in our community and educate them on the basic digital and financial literacy to gain control over their finances and work. I would learn the right way to educate elderly and others on this and hope to one day extend it to all people regardless of age, gender or race. It would be great to see youths and elderly working alongside and helping each other.

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Peiyi Chen's picture

DOG DESERVES

I would like to see more pet-friendly public places like restaurants, gardens in China. Every pet would be taking good care of and no more stray animals

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Rachana Manjunath's picture

When I am in Victoria

I believe our sustainable planning varies according to the location and demographics. For instance, renewable resources preferred in Western Australia is Solar, but the suitable sustainable way of generating and sourcing energy in Tasmania is Hydroelectric power. So, according to our inputs, we model and build our sustainable environments. Victoria, proudly known as the Educational State of Australia, hosts around 490K students, including domestic and 40% international students. The universities are spread across various suburbs of the Melbourne Metropolitan area covering all four directions except few campuses within the CBD region. Naturally, around 400k students are based in the University suburbs. The average demographic age in these suburbs is 23 years old. The average distance between 2 Universities is about 11kms, which makes the Suburbs more educated and diverse, which gives us enough space and resources to facilitate precise waste treatment individually. We throw the waste into respective allocated bins and think we are helping the recycling process. But four bins given by the local council does not solve all the problem. Further, every six months, new students move in, and many students move within the suburbs. As an international student, I have observed that we tend to shop the immediate requirements such as new laundry baskets, containers for the kitchen, heaters, etc., without thinking twice when we move in. The average study duration for students is estimated to be two years. Whenever we carry out or change the place, the suburban streets are left with much-unwanted plastic and other wastes because students think the products are cheap and long-distance movement of these small home products is a burden. Embodied energy and CO2 footprint of these small products in the manufacturing and recycling phase are ten times higher than the transportation and use phase. After careful observation and analysis, I have taken one step of not hurrying about shopping for a new home and reducing possible waste thrown out when I leave. Instead, I have taken the initiative of buying only food essentials in the initial 45-50 days, such as a recyclable bag, collecting cardboard from online orders. Once I complete my 45 days stay in Victoria, I accumulate a pasta jar, ice cream box, and so on to replace buying new things. My next step is to highlight this blind waste to fellow Victorian students by sharing our Victoria home tips during Orientation and University activities as essentials. My following action is to create a universal hub for all Victorian Uni students to plan separation of waste into even more specific categories, such as submitting weekly soft plastics to nearby Coles or Woolworths situated in 2.5kms radius of each suburb. Followed by promoting water-saving Faucets in kitchen stinks, bathroom tap, and gardens around the house and campuses, collecting electronic waste from the respective suburbs, and reallocating between University and local council for the University research training for both students and researchers and finally composting. As most of the suburbs facilitate a share house experience for most students, I have planned to compost our regular food and green waste to grow desired plants. Forming Victorian students hub during our stay will surely influence the Victorian environment.

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Nick Shelmerdine's picture

Impact Investment

My One Step pledge is to adopt impact investing so that my investment approach is done through an ESG/SDG lens. Initially, when I began my investment journey, I invested with only aspirations of maximising monetary gains, setting aside or placing less emphasis on, the social and environmental impacts offrom the business operations. Whilst financial gain is still a key objective of my portfolio actions, it is now imperative to me that I invest in companies which value transparency and have transition plans that are aligned with the SDGs. I do this because I recognise the importance and influence that multinational cooperation’s play in this fight against social injustice and climate change. If we continue to financially support the types of businesses who are not adopting ESG principles and are not aligned to the SDG’s, it only reinforces harmful behaviour which further exacerbates our deteriorating global situation. The investments I make now and into the future will be for positive environmental, social and climate impact enabling me to participate in transitioning to a sustainable future.

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Darsh Chauhan's picture

depoliticise environmentalism

Looking after the environment is something that should bring people of all beliefs together. At a governmental level, this is of course never the case. However, at a local and communal level, we can work together to depoliticise environmentalism. Institutionalising sustainable practices is one way we can ensure individual responsibility. By breaking down what seems like a big goal into bite-sized, actionable, specific, and time-bound steps, we can collectively engage in protecting our environment. I want to work with, educate, and be educated by others as to the best means to achieve this goal.

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Bahar Mirzae's picture

Giving back

On monthly bases, i ensure i contribute to foundation ranging from supporting education to environmental institution to support those who are disadvantage and environmental . no matter how little, it will create change! i aim to contribute to more organisation Feel free to comment any foundations.

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Kit Kirby's picture

FUND PROJECTS IN 3RD WORLD

Buy products from organisations that send profits to positive projects in 3rd world countries. Particularly those focussing on women's education.

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Nichola Ingvarson-Favretto's picture

sustainable growing & eating

I am excited to create a veggie patch in my yard where I will grow fruit, vegetables, herbs, native plants and flowers. This step will be beneficial for the environment, as it will contribute to the reduction of carbon emissions and waste. My family and I will be spending less at the supermarket and will benefit from a healthier diet. I will know exactly what will go into the process of growing my own produce, i.e. no pesticides and no GMOs. I'm grateful to have the resources to contribute.

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Mugni Bustari's picture

TASKU ( My bag)

Using and selling reusable shopping bag for shopping to solve plastic bag pollution and support equality education for orphans.

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