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SDG 3: Good health and wellbeing

Claire Rowan's picture

Be more sustainable

- I will grow my own vegetable and herb garden. This will reduce my carbon footprint with travel to my local market but also create a more sustainable home. - With the fruit and herbs that I cannot eat, I will share with my friends, family and coworkers. - I will compost scraps that my family (dog included) does not eat. And use the compost to nourish my plants and vegetable garden.

Evidence

Hayley Stanich's picture

REDUCE REUSE RECYCLE

Consider how many times you’ve bought more than you need, then tossed half of it in the bin. Whether it be leftover food, unwanted clothing or plastic packaging, the accumulation of this waste in landfills has had a detrimental impact on our enivoment, climate and community - contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and harming marine life through the pollution of oceans and waterways. To help address this growing sustainability threat and decrease the amount of waste I produce, I am adopting a “REDUCE, REUSE, RECYLE” lifestyle. This involves making a conscious effort to only buy what I need, choosing products with less packaging and avoiding single-use items (e.g. plastic straws). I also aim to reuse what I already own - refilling my water bottle from home instead of buying a new one and re-filling used food jars with healthy homemade products. Furthermore, before I throw something away I will think about wether all or part of it can be recycled. By adopting these simple strategies into my everyday life I hope to decrease my waste production and protect the environment. I encourage everyone to join me in taking this action towards ensuring a safe and sustainable future for all!

Evidence

Samuel de Pury's picture

sustainable psychology

The concept "sustainability" often motivates discussion of outcome manipulation, eg: "reduced food waste". Such outcomes are typically envisioned and sought after using unsustainable procedures. For a complex system (eg: a business, a person) to be sustainable it must maintain itself indefinitely, not just produce sustainable outcomes. “Sustainability” is therefore a state, not an endpoint. To maintain sustainability, the structure of a system must be comprised of self-stabilising internal mechanisms. For example, your computer is an unsustainable system since it cannot repair itself. Your eyes are sustainable systems since they can recover from superficial injury without intervention. In seeking to determine the preconditions for a sustainable global civilisation, I realised that my way of approaching the topic of sustainability was itself unsustainable. Since that realisation, I have been studying psychology. I seek to approach sustainability from the ground up. How is my way of thinking about sustainability itself sustainable? How can self-stabilising psychological techniques be applied to larger scale outcome-oriented sustainability endeavours? I then developed a psychological technique for practicing sustainability. Each day I list my sustainable activities and my unsustainable activities, with the added condition that each day must include more sustainability than the last. This technique gives my pursuit of sustainable outcomes viability, integrity, depth, reflectivity, originality, and versatility. My psychological and systems-oriented approach to sustainability could be applied to individuals, relationships, groups, businesses, organisations, and societies and could refine our collective pursuit of a sustainable world.

Evidence

Georgia Saunders's picture

Smart shareholder

I have become a shareholder recently and am beginning to diversify my portfolio - however, I want to be investing in companies that have policy in place for a better future. As I continue to invest I will be a shareholder of ethical and sustainable companies that have a better future regarding any SDGs in focus. Vote with your wallet! photo credit: Emma Tkalcevic

Evidence

Hayley Stanich's picture

LOCAL HARVEST

From savouring produce at the peak of freshness to meeting the people who grow your food, there are countless reasons to support farmers markets. This year I committed to finding and shopping at local fresh fruit and vegetable markets in order to reduce my eco-footprint, promote my health and wellbeing and connect with my community. In addition to providing the freshest and tastiest produce available, farmers markets contain meats, cheeses, and eggs from animals that have been raised without hormones or antibiotics, who have grazed on green grass and eaten natural diets, and who have been spared the cramped and unnatural living conditions of feedlots and cages that are typical of animal agriculture. Purchasing directly from local farmers therefore not only benefits your own health, but promotes the humane treatment of animals! Ultimately, eating locally is beneficial to both the environment and your health, and in putting your dollars into supporting the local community and farmers directly. I encourage everyone to join me in taking this action towards supporting the local community!

Evidence

Samantha Mileto's picture

raise awareness via instagram

I will start an Instagram account linking climate change to social justice issues in Australia with simple steps to take action e.g. how to write to your MP, fossil fuel divestment and more.

Evidence

Muhaimin Habib's picture

Ban waste Dumpings in water

Firstly will promote reduce plastic waste which needs strong promotion of keep your cup. Morover will collaborate with organisations to promote campaigns. Today in the developing countries people are throwing plastics and wastes in lakes and rivers as a result this waterbodies are dying. Not only this large industries are dumping harmful chemical wastes in rivers. So will pledge to the government to make rules and regulations on this acts with the help of difeerent activist organisations.

Evidence

Isobel Barry's picture

Food for thought

I transitioned to a vegan diet at the beginning of the year believing it was the single biggest difference I could make in making the world heal a bit. As my knowledge about food waste, production and manufacturing has increased I want to make an effort o know where my food is from and the miles associated with it. By attending farmer direct markets not only do I limit the supply chain, support small businesses and evade packaging (plastic on oranges, people? really?) , I can form a deeper connection with my food and its seasonality. I want to purchase the majority of my produce direct at market. I recognise this is a privilege of time and money so will endeavour to find was to make it as accessible as possible. This step also reduces food waste as the "ugly food" is always welcome in my basket.

Evidence

Comments

Isobel Barry | 11/04/2020 - 22:01

Fun fact: This food wasn't actually from a farmers market but rescued from the local grocery store produce bin! Free and perfect!

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Isabella Stacey's picture

NUDE FOOD

Having worked part time in the hospitality industry for the last 5 years, I have become painfully aware of how much packaging and food waste is sent to landfill each day. I have always made an effort to minimise my consumption of single use plastics where possible however COVID-19 restrictions resulting in an upsurge of takeaway culture has halted much of the progression made towards sustainability in the hospitality industry. As I partake in this challenge I plan to do the following. 1. Grow fresh herbs at home 2. Continue to use my compost bin 3. Endeavour to buy less food in packaging by shopping in bulk where possible. 4. Continue to support small businesses in the hospitality industry by choosing to eat in if there is not a sustainable takeaway option

Evidence

Comments

Uyen Ho | 11/13/2020 - 22:22

It's definitely a good idea to protect the environment

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Isabella Vecchio's picture

SUSTAINABLE EATING

Melbourners waste on average 200kgs of food per year which rots in landfill releasing harmful greenhouse gasses. My goal is to try and minimise food waste while using reduced packaging. As a part of this challenge I will 1. Regrow vegetables from current food scraps; 2. Buy less food in plastic packaging; 3. Eat all edible parts of the food (i.e. the stems of broccoli); 4. Compost any food waste that cannot be eaten. My hope is to minimise my kitchen's carbon footprint.

Evidence

Comments

Sarah Sapian | 11/12/2020 - 16:29

Additionally, one way to reduce amount of agricultural waste in the landfill is to make your own compost bin. Fruits and vegetables that has one bad can be compost, and this can later be used for gardening. This way we can at least help to reduce landfill waste too.

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