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SDG 10: Reduce inequalities

Monique Scalzo's picture

breaking up with my bank

In an attempt to disrupt the flow of carbon into the atmosphere, I will be disrupting the flow of my money to coal, oil and gas. Like many others, I have switched to a plant-based diet, carry a keep cup and drink bottle and get heated about environmental issues. However, neither my bank nor my super account aligns with my environmental values. The concept of divesting is simple. Without our money, banks cannot keep funding the companies that pollute for profit. I would like to put my money where my mouth is, as the money that you deposit in a bank may be financing projects that fuel the climate crisis. In the last five years since the signing of the Paris Agreement, 35 of the world's leading banks have invested more than US$2.7 trillion in fossil fuel investments and have made over $16.6 billion in profits. Moving my money away from fossil fuels is one of the most powerful and easiest actions that I can take to leave behind the unviable trend of coal. This one step of divestment is proof that small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world. Finally, I would like to use my social media platforms, such as Instagram, to blog about environmental activism. I pledge to use my following to spend more time talking about climate change as there is far too little discussion around the issue in the public sphere. Ultimately, we know that a rapid transformation of our world is possible - evident in how fast corporations, communities and governments have acted throughout this pandemic. Notably, the recent 2021 Sustainable Development Report by the United Nations revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic is a setback for sustainable development everywhere. For the first time since the adoption of the SDGs in 2015, the global average SDG Index score for 2020 has decreased from the previous year. Now more than ever, we must take simple and powerful steps towards healing our one planet.

Evidence

Celina Dhobbie's picture

tackling period stigma

A 2018 report by the United Nations (UN) found that the shame, stigma, and misinformation surrounding periods could lead to severe health and human rights concerns. Resultantly, they declared menstrual hygiene an issue that affects public health, gender equality, and human rights. The report powerfully underlines how shame and misinformation undermine the wellbeing of women and girls, making them vulnerable to gender discrimination, child marriage, exclusion, violence, poverty and untreated health problems. To tackle this problem, I am drafting a proposal to negotiate the provision of sanitary items and anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen for female and unisex bathrooms on campus. I also commit to educate myself and those around me on menstruation by engaging in conversations, open dialogue and learning and volunteering for grassroots organisations focusing on education and alleviating period poverty.

Evidence

Kumiko Kitano's picture

Project of mottainai

Many of our generations are living in a capitalistic society that is extremely convenient and demands constant growth. However, against the backdrop of excessive economic growth and convenience, the global environment is being destroyed and we are facing a climate crisis. I am a master's student in the Cultural and Creative Industries, and I am convinced that the culture of each ethnic group's ancestors and the wisdom of their lives contain various lessons for living in harmony with nature and animals. Therefore, my 'Take One Step' is to create a platform for people from diverse cultural backgrounds to share earth-friendly services, products, and ideas using their own culture and knowledge. “Project of MOTTAINAI” is the name given to this project. The word "MOTTAINAI" is a Japanese word used to describe something that is being thrown away unnecessarily or to express regret about it. In this project, for example, as a Japanese person, I would like to share the idea of "Kintsugi", which means that when a piece of pottery is chipped, you can use gold to connect the chipped part and use it for many years, or you can use unnecessary clothes (kimonos) as rags for cleaning. Other examples include the way indigenous Australians deal with nature, which was introduced in the best-selling book "Sand Talk" as a lesson on the climate crisis, and I feel that such wisdom would be a “MOTTAINAI” if it is not utilized. I also learned that in Australia, people can live comfortably in double-brick houses without using much air conditioning or heating. The purpose of this project is to spread the wisdom and culture of our ancestors, which have gradually fallen into disuse in our convenient modern society, to society once again, feeling that it is a waste that they are not being passed on. At Monash University, where people from diverse cultural backgrounds gather from around the world, there will be a wealth of knowledge that can be shared. I believe that the creativity to learn this knowledge and devise ways of living in our daily lives, as well as the knowledge to change our products to be more earth-friendly, will be extremely valuable.

Evidence

Cathy Chen's picture

Disrupt Dual

Encourage and Teach women and girls, based on their context (e.g. intersecting context), to create memes on social media as a way of empowerment

Evidence

Jierong Zhao's picture

Parental Equality

According to the research, due to the current parental paid leave policy in Australia (the mother can be granted with 18 weeks of paid leave, while the dad or the partner is only limited to 2 weeks of paid leave. Therefore, it is evident that the policy encourages the parental equality with the mothers taking lion share of rearing, while the fathers taking share of the earning, causing the fathers' absenteeism in children's life. However, father's participation in children's rearing is crucial, and if their part is missed out will cause great amount of problems to the child during the lifetime. So my target of this program is to inform the government to increase the amount of time for dads and partners' paid leave.

Evidence

Chloe Jensen's picture

running for vision

I will raise awareness for the inequalities in global health, starting with the Fred Hollows Foundation. I will run 50km over next month and use social media to connect with my community to raise awareness of the need for equal access to healthcare. I really like how this foundation supports Indigenous Australian people as well as people without adequate access to healthcare from around the world. I think sight is something we can often take for granted but it is a lens in which we interpret the world. I chose to advocate for more accessible healthcare for all because simple and inexpensive treatments can help many people minor treat eye problems before it regresses into blindness. https://www.fredsbigrun.org/fundraisers/chloejensen To achieve this goal I will endeavour to walk, run and ride my push bike to work and within my immediate area to reduce my carbon footprint. Infographic: sourced from the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness

Evidence

Angela Veljanoska's picture

Slow Down Fast Fashion

The fast fashion phenomenon is speeding at a high rate. Many popular apparel companies take advantage of hard working labourers (especially from developing countries) to create the clothes we wear, and in return receive little to no pay. Meanwhile, ecosystems are impacted greatly as natural resources such as water are used to produce the clothing we add to our wardrobe. Additionally, fashion manufacturing companies produce heavy smoke and toxic chemicals that potentially impact the air vulnerable communities breathe in, and can cause health problems for biodiversity. I challenge myself to become more sustainably-conscious about the brands I buy/wear and I reduce my carbon footprint by limiting my shopping behaviour on new clothing, and support local vintage shops that sell pre-loved clothes. A shirt with a small rip thrown away equals to throwing away the many hours and resources spent on manufacturing and distribution. Slow down fast fashion to create a sustainable (and fashionable) future.

Evidence

Comments

Russell Reader | 06/29/2021 - 11:39

Cool!

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Nicholas Alexopoulos's picture

stop fast fashion purchases

One of the things that a lot of people don't realize is how wasteful and socially unethical fast fashion is. According to the World Watch Institute it takes approximately 2,700 liters of water just to make one cotton t-shirt, correlating to an amount of drinking water that accommodates one person for 900 days. The cotton industry itself is responsible for 24% of the world's insecticide use and 11% of its pesticides. Not only this, it takes on average 10,000 liters of water to produce just one kilogram of cotton. So it is our responsibility to quit fast fashion and support more sustainable and ethical brands. The likes of Adidas, Nike, Uniqlo, Rip Curl, H&M, Cotton On, Primark, Wish and Urban Outfitters (plus many many more) are associated with at least one of the following disastrous social and environmental impacts: 1. The use of toxic chemicals 2. The severe contamination of water used for washing and drinking 3. The failure to care about animal rights - use of animal products for clothing (leather, fur etc.) 4. The use of child and forced labor 5. The violation of labor rights 6. Poor working conditions and unfair wages - prioritizing profits over individual wellbeing's 7. The authorization of unsafe factories 8. Failure to protect the environment and all natural resources The overproduction and overconsumption of cheap disposable clothing is due to the ever present clothing trends present throughout social media, magazines and online articles. Unfortunately a large sum of people succumb to cheap, new and trendy clothing, and therefore ultimately support the conditions in which these fashion brands uphold. Therefore, as consumers we have the opportunity to care more about the environment, how our clothes are made and the people who made them. We can do this by: 1. Buying less - asking ourselves if we really need this new piece of clothing. 2. Buying higher-quality clothing 3. Buying from ethical and sustainable brands - eg. Patagonia, Kathmandu, Pact, NICO, Etiko 4. Avoiding fashion trends 5. Buying secondhand 6. Re-using, repurposing and up-cycling

Evidence

Cheryl Tan's picture

ARE YOU AWARE?

Are you aware of underprivileged students who have been left behind during this pandemic and are unable to access the internet for online learning? As part of the growing phase, I realize how important education is and could be a life-changing event for most of us to have a better life for ourselves and our families. I am involved in a volunteering and community-based movement through an inspiring camp in Malaysia to support, empower and inspire underprivileged students. Our hope is to provide a positive impact on the lives of today's youth and to bring out the best of them for the nation.

Evidence

Comments

Cheryl Tan | 11/19/2020 - 19:26

Coming here to Melbourne really made me realize how privileged most of us are in terms of good education so I have always wanted to give back to the community to empower the youths back home. I feel that a lot needs to be done, but I hope we can raise public awareness and create a change through Green Steps. #togetherwechangelives

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Reshveny Sanmugam's picture

Healthy ageing

With the global pandemic, there was a rise in digital innovation and an increase usage of technology. The one group that are affected by this would be the elderly due to the lack of understanding of technology. Learning should not be restricted to a certain age group. I pledge to include elderly in our community and educate them on the basic digital and financial literacy to gain control over their finances and work. I would learn the right way to educate elderly and others on this and hope to one day extend it to all people regardless of age, gender or race. It would be great to see youths and elderly working alongside and helping each other.

Evidence

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