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SDG 8: Economic growth and employment

Han Nguyen's picture

EAT AND DRINK sustainably

As a Monash Chemical Engineering Student, I always try to study, work and live in the most sustainable way. I have witnessed garbage bins full of disposable plastic containers and cups after lunch time, and I really want to change this scene. Imagine that tons of garbage would be dumped into the soil or the ocean, which will destroy the whole ecosystem. We are Monash University students, one of the universities with many activities to promote green lifestyle. Therefore, we need to be the pioneer in using reusable containers or cups, water bottles. It's not hard to do. Bring your own containers to the food court, grab lunch and enjoy with friends. It's not hard to do but you probably would save a fish from swallowing plastics.

Evidence

Comments

Shriya Chawla | 06/09/2022 - 23:50

I completely agree! It is very important that we keep a track of our consumption especially single-use items which are dangerous for sea animals.

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Han Nguyen's picture

EAT AND DRINK sustainably

As a Monash Chemical Engineering Student, I always try to study, work and live in the most sustainable way. I have witnessed garbage bins full of disposable plastic containers and cups after lunch time, and I really want to change this scene. Imagine that tons of garbage would be dumped into the soil or the ocean, which will destroy the whole ecosystem. We are Monash University students, one of the universities with many activities to promote green lifestyle. Therefore, we need to be the pioneer in using reusable containers or cups, water bottles. It's not hard to do. Bring your own containers to the food court, grab lunch and enjoy with friends. It's not hard to do but you probably would save a fish from swallowing plastics.

Evidence

Venura Weerasinghe's picture

WHAT'S THE PROBLEM

Oil is cheaper than coke. Even now at the current elevated prices. This fact surprised me when I first read it and I’m sure it’s not one many people know. Because even though many might know that the climate crisis is an issue they might not know why; including me! I didn’t know why switching to sustainable energy is not realistic right now. Why doing that is not only the solution we need? Because what’s the plan for cement? Most of our emissions come from making things including the cement, steel and plastic we use everyday. And why even after we’ve made sustainable ways of moving things, making things and powering things. We still haven’t solved it. Because we need to revert back the damage we’ve done. As an engineer, I found the best way of solving problem is to first understand it. And so my pledge is education. Educating myself on solutions and their difficulties like I did with energy and how I can implement them but also educating others. Because we need more than just engineers, politicians and investors to make a difference.

Evidence

Brittany Spencer's picture

switching super

Change my superannuation fund to Australian Ethical, and inspire others to do the same (or at least become aware and intentional of the impact their super is contributing to)

Evidence

Harriet Harte's picture

Implement circular practices

The concept of Circularity and the Circular economy present a novel pathway to achieving sustainable development. Circularity creates alternate systems that keep products in a cycle of use and continual reuse as well as regenerating natural systems and reducing pollution and waste. These practices are best adopted by businesses and this should be encouraged and promoted. However, on an individual level I plan to increase my own circularity practices through a variety of different avenues. Firstly, I pledge to purchase more food products from bulk source shops and markets as opposed to supermarkets to reduce my plastic consumption. This will greatly reduce my contribution to land fill. Additionally, I will stop buying new clothes unless it is absolutely necessary (eg: I am going hiking and need protective equipment). It is widely known how destructive the fashion industry is to the environment, people and the planet so by removing myself as a consumer of products from this industry I will help to make a change, however small. Finally, I will educate my housemates and friends on what the Circular Economy is and why it is important for businesses to work towards as well as individuals. I have already shared many tips with my friends to reduce waste and I will continue to do this while also integrating Circularity concepts.

Evidence

Monique Scalzo's picture

breaking up with my bank

In an attempt to disrupt the flow of carbon into the atmosphere, I will be disrupting the flow of my money to coal, oil and gas. Like many others, I have switched to a plant-based diet, carry a keep cup and drink bottle and get heated about environmental issues. However, neither my bank nor my super account aligns with my environmental values. The concept of divesting is simple. Without our money, banks cannot keep funding the companies that pollute for profit. I would like to put my money where my mouth is, as the money that you deposit in a bank may be financing projects that fuel the climate crisis. In the last five years since the signing of the Paris Agreement, 35 of the world's leading banks have invested more than US$2.7 trillion in fossil fuel investments and have made over $16.6 billion in profits. Moving my money away from fossil fuels is one of the most powerful and easiest actions that I can take to leave behind the unviable trend of coal. This one step of divestment is proof that small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world. Finally, I would like to use my social media platforms, such as Instagram, to blog about environmental activism. I pledge to use my following to spend more time talking about climate change as there is far too little discussion around the issue in the public sphere. Ultimately, we know that a rapid transformation of our world is possible - evident in how fast corporations, communities and governments have acted throughout this pandemic. Notably, the recent 2021 Sustainable Development Report by the United Nations revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic is a setback for sustainable development everywhere. For the first time since the adoption of the SDGs in 2015, the global average SDG Index score for 2020 has decreased from the previous year. Now more than ever, we must take simple and powerful steps towards healing our one planet.

Evidence

Noa Kerwick's picture

What a Waste

In 2020 I became the Youth Member for the electorate of Currumbin appointed to the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee in the Queensland Youth Parliament. One of the many things I did during my tenure was publish an article on Australia's $10 billion food waste issue. Although it's far from being a glamorous topic of conversation, food waste is something I'm actually quite passionate about. For years I've been researching and discussing the multifarious implications of food waste and brainstorming ways in which to mitigate this global phenomenon. In 2018 after being in the first cohort to complete the Macquarie University Incubator's pilot 'Go Start' Program, I participated in the Sydney-Hong Kong Ideation Exchange Program where I spent two-weeks visiting start-ups, universities and businesses in Australia, Hong Kong and China. During this time, I co-created a new start-up called 'Ag-Eye' which sought to utilise drone and smart technology to facilitate farming practices; reducing costs, manpower expenditures and food waste for Australian farmers. In 2019 I wrote my thesis for my major in anthropology at Macquarie University on the benefits of community gardens. Through my six months of participant observation research I found that community gardens had a plethora of mental, physical, environmental and monetary benefits to individuals, families and communities - in particular newly arrived immigrants. My goal with this 'Take One Step' initiative is to continue my journey and challenge students, staff, residential halls and food venues at Monash University to mitigate the amount of food they waste.

Evidence

Ria Parmar's picture

Sustainable kitchen

Firstly, I'm committing to becoming fully vegetarian. I've been mostly plant based in the past but I'd like to take it one step further. I also want to significantly reduce single use plastics in my kitchen by preparing meals in tupperware and making my own snacks at home to further reduce plastic waste such as packaging. I'll be making my own protein balls, dairy free milk and trail mix etc. rather than purchasing them from a supermarket to cut down on non recyclable packaging and waste. I've purchased beeswax wraps to use in place of gladwrap to store items in the fridge and to bring to university or work. My family has also stopped using plastic bags. With the remaining ones at home, we reuse them as bin liners. I'd also like to bulk buy more of my groceries and visit nearby, local farmers markets to support them. All these steps will contribute to a more sustainable kitchen and diet that will hopefully inspire those around me to take similar, small actions.

Evidence

Reeya Ujoodha's picture

Thrifting

Clothes and other items never remain forever by our side. Eventually they become smaller in size, out of style or etc. I have many such items such as shoes, clothes, bags and jewelleries that I do not use. After giving so much to orphanages, after a while they told us that they had enough items for twice the amount of children. Therefore I came up with an idea. THRIFTING! It was a win-win situation and got some friends to embark on this journey with me. I plan to start a website or a page on social media to sell my items at very low prices. In this way, I am decreasing wastage. Also, I am decreasing my carbon footprint, since the production of clothes and its shipping costs a lot of non-renewable energy. With thrifting, people will buy less new clothes and will only aid in recycling old ones. Win-win indeed!

Evidence

Mwansa Kawesha's picture

Small Changes Count

In regards to "Small Changes Count ", This step is that with one small action done by one person can change someone's life .During this pandemic we are in Lockdown and that should not stop us from being environmentally friendly and also being more healthy. Small changes we make in our everyday living will make a big difference in the environment .

Evidence

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