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SDG 7: Clean energy

Rasika Mhetre's picture

Sustainable lifestyle

I take a pledge to have a sustainable lifestyle. Since the material and energy demands of modern society are increasing day by day, there’s a strain on natural resources. Everyone talks about reducing the garbage, recycling, and reusing the materials, but no one is very keen on reducing consumption. I have seen people who love to shop a lot as per the latest fashion trends. Most of them wear the new cloth hardly one or two times and then it becomes garbage. Fast fashion is not only increasing the garbage but it is also affecting the waterways and human health. The dyes used in the textile industry affect the marine environment as they are very difficult to treat. Removing the dye from the water requires ozone treatment which is highly energy-intensive and which again impacts the planet. Hence, I would like to create awareness in society that how we can have a sustainable lifestyle and contribute to having more greener and cleaner earth. Reducing the consumption at the source itself can make a huge difference to save the planet. Along with sustainable consumption, I am committed to reducing my carbon footprint by taking the following steps: • Use of public transportation • Avoid unnecessary shopping • Tree plantation • Avoid food wastage • Use Organic green processed products • Responsible electricity consumption • Use reused and recycled products • Promote awareness about water recycling and reuse for potable and nonpotable applications

Evidence

Emily Clarke's picture

Responsible finances

My pledge is to move my money away from banks that fund fossil fuels and change my superannuation investment to sustainable choices. Despite the International Energy Agency stating that there is “no room for new or expanded gas, coal and oil projects”; and the big four banks committing to the Paris agreement, they are still funding huge fossil fuel projects each year. Superannuation companies are also cashing in on fossil fuel investments, but we can choose to move our bank accounts and super to a responsible lenders and investors. Many people are unaware that their money is being invested in this way and that they can make a choice to move away from unsustainable investments. If everyone did this, we could send a huge message to financial companies that it is not ok to use our money to fund climate destruction, and this could see them changing their lending and investment practices.

Evidence

Tom Zhang's picture

POWER OFF

I'm a culprit of leaving electronics turned on because of the sake that "I'll be using it later". But later sometimes turns into never and I end up leaving my computer or laptop on for the whole day. So in future I'll be more aware of this, and actually turn off the electronics that I won't be using so I can reduce my carbon footprint.

Evidence

Joshna Baskar's picture

SUSTAINABILITY, SAVE, REPEAT

The One Step I would like to take is one which I have successfully started in my high school in New Zealand and would like to initiate at Monash University. New Zealand’s government has a goal to become carbon neutral by 2050 so we students wanted our school to have a realistic plan to achieve this goal. We created an Energy Management System which was essentially a structure assigning particular roles to students and senior leadership to carry out energy management projects including Auditing, Communication, Documentation and Analysis. In order to sustain energy management projects, we wanted the school to commit to reinvest all energy savings made towards further energy efficient and sustainable technology; creating a cycle and eventually leading to achieving the goal of being carbon neutral. I presented this in the form of an Energy Management Poicy to the School Board of Trustees to gain their commit to reinvesting all energy savings made towards energy efficient and sustainable technology. We wanted our Energy Management System to be inline with an international standard so we know our plan will lead to real action and will actually help us become carbon neutral by 2030. So the school's sustainability committee and myself helped Epsom Girls Grammar School attain the ISO 50001 Certification in Energy Management and we were successful in gaining the accreditation in 2020. My One Step is to help Monash University to set a policy to reinvest all energy savings made, towards further energy efficient and sustainable technology. I also aim to help Monash University to attain the ISO 50001 Certification in Energy Management to work alongside Monash University’s preexisting plan to to have net zero carbon emissions by 2030 and be inline with an international standard. It can be done if we make a plan and take action today. Some of the energy management projects we conducted at the school involved actions such as: - Installing an electric energy efficient heating and ventilation system for the school’s Swimming Pool. This system was is expected to reduce electricity usage by almost $50,000/ in the first year. - Developing a checklist procedure for each block at Epsom Girls Grammar School to assist staff and students confirm that all service and equipment are turned off at the end of the term and holiday period. - Changing every single light fixture in the school into LED lights. Links: Epsom Girls Grammar School attains 1SO50001 certification: https://www.eggs.school.nz/news/eggs-iso-50001/ ISO50001 standard: https://www.iso.org/iso-50001-energy-management.html

Evidence

Mirabel Somtochukwu Okoli's picture

Waste MINIMISATION

When going to get something to eat, I will always go with my reusable plastic plate and cup and request for my food be put into it so as to reduce the amount of waste created in the environment

Evidence

Comments

Shriya Chawla | 06/09/2022 - 23:54

When on the go, we end up using single-use items when buying food and beverages. A few minutes of convenience has such a huge impact on our environment and harms flora and fauna. I try and carry my own tiffin/cup/ straw by keeping one in my bag for such scenarios.

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Venura Weerasinghe's picture

WHAT'S THE PROBLEM

Oil is cheaper than coke. Even now at the current elevated prices. This fact surprised me when I first read it and I’m sure it’s not one many people know. Because even though many might know that the climate crisis is an issue they might not know why; including me! I didn’t know why switching to sustainable energy is not realistic right now. Why doing that is not only the solution we need? Because what’s the plan for cement? Most of our emissions come from making things including the cement, steel and plastic we use everyday. And why even after we’ve made sustainable ways of moving things, making things and powering things. We still haven’t solved it. Because we need to revert back the damage we’ve done. As an engineer, I found the best way of solving problem is to first understand it. And so my pledge is education. Educating myself on solutions and their difficulties like I did with energy and how I can implement them but also educating others. Because we need more than just engineers, politicians and investors to make a difference.

Evidence

Grace Bennetts's picture

reducing food waste

The amount of food Australia throws away each year would fill the MCG ten times over. This is a big contributor to climate change. The UN states that 17% of global food production is wasted, tallying to almost 1 billion tonnes per year. Australia, is a large contributor, producing 7.6 million tonnes of food waste a year. The old saying 'waste not want not' rings true, and it asks us to consider how we can dispose of this issue, instead of disposing of this much food. A starting point at home, can be taking the time to plan meals each week so that you only buy the food you need. Supermarkets have strict regulations as to 'quality' of fresh fruit and vegetables, resulting in tonnes of perfectly nutritious and good groceries being rejected. Buying food from local grocers where it is less likely to be wrapped in plastic also, will reduce the amount of food being thrown away or left to rot. Food waste reduction strategies can also be adopted by Monash University when it comes to catering for events. Careful consideration of the number of guests present will mean the right amount of food is ordered such that there is none left over. If there is, the university could donate this to Foodbank, Secondbite or homeless shelters. Students can also play their own part whilst on campus by correctly disposing of their food waste into the right bins, and the university should consider providing food/compost disposal options as well. I pledge to play my part at home and whilst on campus, to reduce my total greenhouse gas emissions.

Evidence

Joshna Baskar's picture

train/bus to uni everyday

I will use a bus or train to go to University everyday. Three days a week, instead of taking the bus from the train station to Uni, I will walk or bike from the train station to Uni to cut down emissions and for my health.

Evidence

Grace Bennetts's picture

BIKE RIDE OR WALK TO CLASS

I pledge to ride my bike or run to university every day that I have class, for the rest of the year at the very least. I am aware that many students don't have the privilege of living close enough to campus to bike ride or walk to class. However, even catching public transport rather than driving will significantly reduce emissions when it comes to the daily transport of students to and from university. Now that more students are physically visiting campus after nearly two years of online learning, it is important to remember the environmental impacts of driving to school or work. The idea in walking, bike riding or running is that these methods of transport save energy, produce no emissions, whilst also keeping you fit and isolated from anyone else you may be concerned about carrying COVID-19 on public transport. In addition, over the past couple of years Melbourne city has updated the bike lanes leading into the city, especially from the northern suburbs. Monash University has also played a part in providing more bike lock stations outside the city campus, which is where I attend uni. This community infrastructure exists to make it easier for commuters to make an environmentally conscious decision, every day. Even if I choose to drive one day less a week, this will ultimately have a huge impact in slowing the progress of climate change. I believe that everyone doing their own part, will add up :)

Evidence

Ahnaf Ibn Sayeed's picture

Just keep climbing

Living on the 9th floor, I have to take the elevator quite frequently (four times a day at best). Recently, I met someone who said that they stopped using the elevator altogether and only takes the stairs. This really inspired me as I want to have a healthier lifestyle while also reducing my carbon footprint. Following his example, I have been taking the stairs for the past few weeks and I don't plan on stopping anytime soon.

Evidence

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